Posts tagged “raw canvas

Spring Cleaning

I’ve been working steady on my paintings and I haven’t finished any of the big projects I’ve been working on but I decided to post some of the smaller things that have been going through my head. The painting titled “Cathedral” was started in 2012 and then left to collect dust since then. As it was painted on raw canvas I was worried about its stability over time so one of the reasons I went back into it was to try to improve its longevity. When painting on raw canvas there are several issues that can become apparent over time, if the fabric isn’t washed before being painted on it will discolour over time due to chemicals in the fabric. And, if you use anything but distilled water on the canvas that can also cause issues with stability over time. The single biggest problem with raw canvas is that it’s very hard to clean and accumulates dust over time. So, in addition to reworking the painting I made an effort to improve its durability. I’ve been moving away from raw canvas lately but continue to use it in certain circumstances.

The other painting in this post (the 18 x 24 untitled) is as durable as paintings can be. Stretched on washed and gessoed canvas, protected for support induced discolouration (SID) and then coated with two layers of a GAC-500 isolation medium and finally varnished with a UV resistant, removable polymer. Paintings done like this one are easy to clean and can last a very long time without changing at all.

 

And here are a few others I’ve been working on lately, they’re not really related to the others. One is acrylic on paper, just a sketch. The others are on rigid supports because of the heavy impasto techniques used, they’re an experiment in “mixed media.”


Preparing Your Canvas: Part 2, Acrylics

22 x 30 Acrylic on Raw Canvas. This painting is an example of the flexibility of acrylic paint on raw (unprimed)canvas. Even though the painting is old it is showing no signs of decay.

22 x 30 Acrylic on Raw Canvas. This painting is an example of the flexibility of acrylic paint on raw (unprimed)canvas. Even though the painting is old it is showing no signs of decay.

 

Acrylic paintings much less fragile than oil paintings. Acrylics are basically plastics, so using them on a canvas is like sealing that surface with plastic and can actually add to the longevity of the surface. For this reason it’s perfectly possible to use acrylics on raw canvas or other textiles without them negatively impacting the substrate. Gesso will still increase the life span of the painting but the acrylics will not eat away at the support like oils or solvents do. Additionally, many acrylics now come with a UV protective agent which helps to protect the painting from the harmful effects of the sun.

22 x 30 Acrylic and Gesso on Raw Canvas. In this example the background blues are painted on raw canvas, the black is a coloured gesso which gives an additional dimension to the painting.

22 x 30 Acrylic and Gesso on Raw Canvas. In this example the background blues are painted on raw canvas, the black is a coloured gesso which gives an additional dimension to the painting.